DXperience moving to .NET 3.5 or above after next major release

ctodx
01 July 2011

One of the discussions we had last week was over our continued support for Visual Studio 2005 and .NET versions prior to 3.5. We’ve come to the conclusion that we are unnecessarily limiting the features we can produce for WinForms and ASP.NET.

Welding Starburstphoto © 2008 Casimiro Zmtih | more info (via: Wylio)(Aside: remember that our WPF and Silverlight products now require Visual Studio 2010 and .NET 4.0 in order that we can provide the best story with regard to design-time and run-time functionality. ASP.NET MVC requires Visual Studio 2008 or later and .NET 3.5 or later already.)

So what are we missing out with by continuing to support .NET 2.0 with our controls? The most obvious answer is LINQ and lambda expressions. Although we use them to a certain extent in example programs we provide as part of support, we can’t embrace them at all in our core code. That also means we can’t readily provide APIs that support LINQ or lambda expressions.

Continuing, we have:

  • The var type. Yes, we’d like to use it in certain scenarios since it has the ability to make the code easier to read.
  • Partial classes? Would be nice too, although I’m not sure where we could use them, apart form in our demo apps.
  • Automatic properties? +1, several times over.
  • Anonymous types? Certainly.
  • Extension methods? Well… OK, the jury is still out on that feature for our libraries.
  • WCF? Sure thing, we’d love to use it internally where needed or to provide APIs for it.

So, we took a look at our customer data with regard to usage of Visual Studio 2005 and .NET 2.0/3.0. It turns out that the number of customers (that we can detect, admittedly) using VS2005 is dropping remarkably quickly. From May last year to June this year, the number of customers using VS2005 has dropped 90%. A year ago, we saw 24% of customers using VS2005, now roughly 3% of our customers are still using it. By November/December, when we release v2011.2, how many will there be?

The decision we came to is to make v2011.1 the final major release where we will support Visual Studio 2005 and versions of .NET earlier than 3.5, just as we did five years ago when v2006.3 became the final version to support Visual Studio 2002/2003 and .NET 1.x. DXperience v2011.2 will only support Visual Studio 2008 or later, and .NET 3.5 or later.

So what do you think? Are you still using VS2005 and .NET 2.0? Or have you moved on to later versions already and found we’re holding you back? Let me know, either as a comment to this post, or by emailing me directly at julianb@devexpress.com. Of course, you can also email the full management team using management@devexpress.com, if you wish.

117 comment(s)
Nate Laff
Nate Laff

Bleh, just move it to 4 :)

1 July, 2011
Steven Rasmussen
Steven Rasmussen

I'm of the same opionion as Nate.  Might as well move on to 4.0

1 July, 2011
Peter Thorpe
Peter Thorpe

I think this is the right decision, anything that makes your life easier and code more readable obviously eventually results in more features and less bugs for us.

I would think most people with .NET 2.0 projects can move to 3.5 relatively easily. 4.0 is bit more of a jump I now I have a project that couldn't currently move because of other dependencies. Maybe another jump in a year or two.

1 July, 2011
Michael Proctor [DX-Squad]
Michael Proctor [DX-Squad]

I hope DX isn't planning on taking a 10 year step back in their libraries, that will put us back into ActiveX :D :D

"By November/December, when we release v2001.2, how many will there be?"

I assume there might be a 1 disguised as a 0 ;)

I kinda agree with Nate as well, I moved my project to .NET 4 to make things easier for myself with TPL.

If this would allow DX to provide more features with less bugs, with better efficiency, then people still using .NET 2/3.5 can think of moving to .NET 4 themselves to get the next big features.

2012 will be getting closer to vNext and .NET 5 and Win8 so if you don't jump to 4 then might as well jump to 5 in 2013. :D

1 July, 2011
Jerrie Pelser
Jerrie Pelser

I also wouldn't mind if you jumped straight to .NET 4 and VS2010

1 July, 2011
Chris M (NISC)
Chris M (NISC)

Other 3rd-party tools and components we're utilizing have moved to .NET 4.0 already so we're moving right along with them. I too wouldn't mind the jump to that so it goes without saying 3.5 is fine.

2 July, 2011
Martin Praxmarer - DevExpress MVP
Martin Praxmarer - DevExpress MVP

+1 for moving to .NET 4.0

2 July, 2011
Pravin Taneja
Pravin Taneja

I would welcome this move, change is the only constant thing in life.

2 July, 2011
Mark Harby
Mark Harby

We're all .NET 4 now.

Those not able to move up will probably be fixed on an earlier set of component releases also.

2 July, 2011
Dusan Pupis
Dusan Pupis

+1 for moving to 4.0

2 July, 2011
Neven
Neven

+1 for moving to 4.0

2 July, 2011
Theodore p
Theodore p

+1 for moving to 4.0

2 July, 2011
Gosha
Gosha

+1 for moving to 4.0 - PLEASE DO THAT AT LAST!

2 July, 2011
Peter Thorpe
Peter Thorpe

Although I said earlier I do have a project that is stuck at 3.5. After thinking about it your first release not supporting 2.0 is a year down the line from now, plenty of time for me and others to sort these issues. Even if I can't fix it I will just leave it with the last version of the controls supporting that version. 4.0 FTW.

You could always poll it like you did with IE 6.

2 July, 2011
John E. Young
John E. Young

I would say straight to 4, but most people who use my software are in healthcare, hospitals to be more specific.  Getting some of them to allow 3.5 to be installed was a chore.

2 July, 2011
Roger Parry
Roger Parry

3.5 is fine for me (probably 4 would be OK too)

2 July, 2011
Fırat Esmer
Fırat Esmer

+1 for .Net Framework 4

2 July, 2011
CESAR F. QüEB
CESAR F. QüEB

+1 for .Net Framework 4.

2 July, 2011
Emmanuel
Emmanuel

+1 for .NET Framework 4.0

2 July, 2011
ZeroUno
ZeroUno

+1 for .Net Framework 4.

2 July, 2011
daniel weisel
daniel weisel

I would love to say "+1 for .NET 4", but there is a catch: In order to use .NET 4, people need to upgrade their VS version to 2010 (since VS 2008 does not support .NET 4), and I still suspect there are plenty of developers out there still using 2008. I think I would say for sure to move to .NET 3.5, but to wait another year (until 2013) to move to .NET. by then, .NET 5 and VS 2012 should be out for a months already, and most people should be working by then with VS 2010 / 2012.

So, +1 for moving to .NET 3.5, but to .NET 4 I would wait until 2013.

2 July, 2011
Orhan.Aykut
Orhan.Aykut

+1 for .Net Framework 4.

2 July, 2011
Juan Betancourt
Juan Betancourt

+1 for the same said by Daniel Weisel: support for .NET 3.5

2 July, 2011
Ralf Steinbrink
Ralf Steinbrink

+1 for .Net Framework 4.

2 July, 2011
Theera Piroonratana
Theera Piroonratana

+1 for .Net Framework 4.

2 July, 2011
Jurjen de Groot
Jurjen de Groot

+1 for .Net Framework 4

3 July, 2011
InnovaTex
InnovaTex

+1 for .Net Framework 4.

3 July, 2011
benny shen
benny shen

move to .net 4 and vs2010.

3 July, 2011
David Brillon
David Brillon

3.5.  Jumping to 4.0 is not an option right now for our client.

3 July, 2011
Rinaldo Ferreira Junior
Rinaldo Ferreira Junior

I vote to move to .Net 4.0 and I agree with your plan to keep support to .Net 2.0 till the next major version. We are migrating our projects from VS2008 to VS2010 but it takes time. Giving your customers this additional time is a very good decision.

3 July, 2011
Chloe Anfield
Chloe Anfield

3.5, but support VS2008.

I have to support a XAF application with a matching Windows Mobile application and it'd be awkward to have to use VS2010 for one half and VS2008 for the other half.

3 July, 2011
Sigurd Decroos
Sigurd Decroos

3.5 still required here! I can't convert my ERP project to 4.0 just yet. It will take another year, then, it should be possible, finally!

3 July, 2011
Kurt Wehrend
Kurt Wehrend

I think DevExpress needs to take the leap and move straight to 4.0. Our company platform is now supporting 4.0 plus as you said WPF/Silverlight requires it and are gaining more traction in the technology space.

This way you dont contrain development and we the customer can really benefit.

Take the leap, otherwise you'll be left behind.

Kurt

3 July, 2011
Michael Curry.
Michael Curry.

I'd also welcome the jump directly to 4.0, this product needs to be kept at the cutting edge.

3 July, 2011
Carlo De Prosperis
Carlo De Prosperis

+1 for .Net Framework 4.

4 July, 2011
Marco De Tullio
Marco De Tullio

+1 move to .NET 4

4 July, 2011
Humus
Humus

+1 for .Net Framework 4.

4 July, 2011
Frank von der Höh
Frank von der Höh

From my point of view: +1 for .Net Framework 4, but I suspect quite a number of developers are stuck on 3.5 for various reasons.

4 July, 2011
darko cernik
darko cernik

it should be .net 4. definitely.

4 July, 2011
Brian Maxim
Brian Maxim

I would support a move to .NET4 however there is a critical bug in VS2010 that MS haven’t fixed despite it being reported virtually when the product was released. It may not even be fixed in VS2010 at all! Its causing a lot of pain for a lot of developers and the workarounds are awkward.

blogs.msdn.com/.../resgen-exe-error-an-attempt-was-made-to-load-a-program-with-an-incorrect-format.aspx

connect.microsoft.com/.../error-when-compiling-resx-file-seems-related-to-beta2-bug-5252020

4 July, 2011
Vassilios Pallis
Vassilios Pallis

+1 for Net 4

4 July, 2011
IngoManthey
IngoManthey

+1 for moving to 4.0

4 July, 2011
Tom Shane
Tom Shane

+1 for .NET 4

4 July, 2011
Miro Nagy
Miro Nagy

I use vs2008 3.5 and I would say "Move To 4.0" as well.

Keep the features coming.  I will upgrade my version when the time comes.  

Worst case I become on a stagnant version.  I don't use all the features now of all your controls - but many of your customers probably do.

I would not be upset at all if I was "Left in the dust unless I upgrade my VS version."

I won't upgrade most likely till vs2012 comes around.  No sense in me upgrading every 2 years.

I would be happy to pay a 'smaller / holding' subscription fee for a bug fix / stagnant version of the controls...and when the time comes to upgrade - then bump me back to a regular price.

-Just my thought.

Im happy with the controls either way.

Cheers'

4 July, 2011
Christian Peters
Christian Peters

+1 for .NET Framework 4.0

4 July, 2011
Roger Areia
Roger Areia

I would say move to 4 also, but to make it explicit, this means the if we have applications that must run on an unsupported 3.5 platform (Windows 2000) we will have to have another version of VS (2008 for example) and use release 9 of DevExpress.  As long as DX continues to support release 2009, I have no problems.

4 July, 2011
Robert Fuchs
Robert Fuchs

+1

But move straight forward to FW 4.0

4 July, 2011
David De Smet
David De Smet

+1 for .NET Framework 4.0

No need to still holding us back!

4 July, 2011
Christophe Keller @ PTS
Christophe Keller @ PTS

I'd prefer if DevExpress didn't make the jump to 4.0 directly. I'll need to support a ClickOnce application that clients install over the internet and I doubt that they all have .Net 4.0 installed

5 July, 2011
Julien C
Julien C

+1 for .Net 4.0

Old projects using .Net 2.0 can continue to use 11.1.x and there is no reason to start new projects using .Net 2.0!

5 July, 2011
Nate Laff
Nate Laff

Chrostophe, Click Once can automatically install .NET 4 if it's not installed already...

I make .NET 4 a prereq for my application and it installs when necessary. Works great.

5 July, 2011
Luis Guzman
Luis Guzman

+1 move to .NET 4 and JQuery standard. Please maturity in MVC controls.

5 July, 2011
Richard Choroszewski
Richard Choroszewski

Our team are fine with a move straight to 4

5 July, 2011
Eli Weg
Eli Weg

+1 .net 4

6 July, 2011
Christopher Todd
Christopher Todd

+1 for 4.0

6 July, 2011
Liu Xinrong
Liu Xinrong

+1 for moving to 4.0

6 July, 2011
John Newcombe
John Newcombe

+1 for moving to 3.5

We have only just moved from VS2008 to VS2010 in the last month. The intention is to move to 4.0 then to 5.0,  this will not happen probably to next year as the VS upgrade was time consuming.

7 July, 2011
Oliver Avieny
Oliver Avieny

+1 for moving to 4.0

7 July, 2011
Luk
Luk

+1 for .net 3.5

But .net 4.0 is a no go for us. We have a WinForms project that won't be upgraded to 4.0* in a long time and we want support for it.

* because its problematic, expensive and VS2010 is way slower than VS2008

7 July, 2011
Alex Boston
Alex Boston

+1 for .net 4.0

And for those who can't use 4.0 I recommend to you to stick to DX 11.1.5 and work your way to upgrade to .net 4 first rather than spending time upgrading the DX from version to another.  

7 July, 2011
Howard Herrera
Howard Herrera

+1 for moving to 4.0

7 July, 2011
Andreas Grabmüller
Andreas Grabmüller

I'm still maintainig one program that requires 2.0 - because the newer ones don't run on Windows 2000. And while I strongly advocate against it, there are still people out there running that old OS.

That said, I'm perfectly fine if newer DX versions don't support 2.0 - as long as you maintain the 2011.1 release as you have done for 2006.3 for VS2003 users.

I'm for moving directly to 4.0.

7 July, 2011
Shawn Oles (Strata)
Shawn Oles (Strata)

+1 for .net 4.0.    I dont know of any projects that rely on 3.5

7 July, 2011
Ivan Arjentinski
Ivan Arjentinski

+1 for .NET 4!

13 July, 2011
James Bragg
James Bragg

Move to .Net 4 and don't look back. 5 will be hear before we know it, and 4 will be the legacy environment.

Just because you move to .Net 4 doesn't mean people who've invested millions in .Net 2 code have to do anything. They will still be able to continue to support and maintain their code with v2011.2 for years to come. How many of you have multiple versions of dx installed on your dev boxes?  As another poster said, change is the only constant in our industry.

13 July, 2011
Vince Noga
Vince Noga

All my .Net applications are .Net 2.0.  However, I do use the Visual Studio 2008 IDE.  Going forward I suppose moving to .Net 3.5 will not be a problem, other than .Net 3.5 not being as widely pre-installed as .Net 2.0.

Visual Studio 2010 and .Net 4.0 are not an option for me.  Almost every project I work on involves some form of Windows Mobile Device, and while I understand that your products are not for the Mobile Device world, I want to stick with a single IDE and platform target for my solutions that require both desktop and mobile software -- which means Visual Studio 2008 and .Net 3.5 until Microsoft allows more than Windows Phone 7 development in Visual Studio 2010.

13 July, 2011
Richard Kerry
Richard Kerry

While I agree this sounds very logical, the unfortunately reality is that Microsoft still require Visual Studio 2005 for some Windows Mobile development.

As with many people out there, I suspect the platform has been effectively thrown to the wolves. But, code that has already been supplied to end customers still needs support.

I'm currently running both 2005 and 2010 so it nice to be able to run DevExpress in both :)

13 July, 2011
Venu Choudary 1
Venu Choudary 1

Move on to 4.0 and VS 2010

13 July, 2011
renejdm
renejdm

Please do not jump directly into 4.0. I have a WinForms app that is in 3.5 with Visual Studio 2008. I have no plans to upgrade to VS2010 and 4.0. All the people here who want you to support 4.0 exclusively must only be working with VS2010. I would re-think buying a subscription from you if you alienate me. The only reason I use your components is because they are the best (IMHO) for WinForms development.

13 July, 2011
Steeve Berube
Steeve Berube

+1 for move to .net 3.5+ and vs2010

13 July, 2011
Bill Sorensen
Bill Sorensen

The company I work for made the jump to .NET 4. We haven't regretted it.

13 July, 2011
Fernando Loureiro
Fernando Loureiro

Please, Go on ASAP. We are blocked!

13 July, 2011
Mike DePouw SIF
Mike DePouw SIF

+1 for move to .net 3.5+ and vs2008+

13 July, 2011
Andres Villalta Periera
Andres Villalta Periera

+1 for moving to 4.0

13 July, 2011
Kendall Miller
Kendall Miller

We did a similar set of surveying of our customers about whether we could require 4.0 to run our UI and what version of the runtimes we have to support in deployment.  What we got back was 100% of those surveyed were fine with us requiring the developers to have .NET 4.0 installed, but 35% are still expecting to ship applications that target .NET 2.0 through the next 12 months.  While folks are updating visual studio, that doesn't always mean they are shipping targetting the highest version that runtime supports.  Of the same audience, 90% had or were adopting VS 2010 in the same period.  

So for now we're going to keep targeting .NET 2.0 as our lowest runtime for redistribution but require .NET 4.0 for the developer tools.  We will probably start shipping a .NET 4.0 - optimized version of our APIs as well, which is the other choice you have.  Of course, that creates its own suite of problems.

13 July, 2011
Uwe Keim
Uwe Keim

-10,000 points for moving to .NET 3.5 :-(

For our ASP.NET-side, it is a no-brainer to move to .NET 4.

For our Windows Forms projects it would be a desaster: We do not need 3.5, neither 4.0 as we try to reach a very broad audience to use our Windows Forms applications.

Forcing our customers to upgrade their system is likely to drive them away to competitors.

That said, I'm sure that I cannot stand against the evolution and progress; it is just that most of our projects then will stick with 2011.1 and cannot be updated for a long time.

Not bad, just not the best news I read today.

13 July, 2011
Eduardo Quintana
Eduardo Quintana

Hi!

I only use .Net Framework 4.0 with all updates available.

To me particularly, it would only be necessary the 4.0 version. No need for compilations in other Framework versions.

Eduardo Quintana

13 July, 2011
William Morgenweck
William Morgenweck

4.0 is fine

13 July, 2011
Damien Bhanji
Damien Bhanji

Quite happy for it all to move to VS2010 and .Net 4.0

Damien Bhanji

Take A Byte Limited (UK).

13 July, 2011
Metro Sauper
Metro Sauper

+1 .net 4.0

13 July, 2011
Darren Gapp
Darren Gapp

Unfortunately, we're still and will be limited by our customer base to .NET 2.0 due to system requirements. We made the jump from VB6 to .NET 2.0 when we released our newest major version of our product two years ago, and we have still not heard the end of it in regards to most of our customers needing to upgrade their computers.  While we hope they upgraded enough to not need to again with the newer frameworks, we definitely have no interest in moving to the newer frameworks for them yet.

That being said, we use VS2010 and love it.  Are we missing out by not being on the newest frameworks and potentially not using the newest DevEx releases, a little bit, but it will not make a difference to us in the end as these "newer" features will most likely not be implemented or used by our customers.

Our internal tools, products, and web sites run on a variety of framework versions, and we would welcome the pushed change to some degree in that regard.

The one thing we can't have is something being utterly outright broken, and/or unfixable with no workaround and be "stuck" with broken functionality because the only fix is to move to a new version/release.  As long as this case doesn't arise, you've got my +1 for .NET 4.0 and VS2010.  I only mention this because we did have this scenario across a major release a few years ago with one of your components, but luckily it was not forced framework changes.

13 July, 2011
Daniel Galloway 1
Daniel Galloway 1

Moving to 3.5 should be relatively easy for most 2.0 projects. I feel going all the way to 4.0 only would be a mistake since there is still a lot of code designed for that framework and dependencies.

13 July, 2011
Tim Ogle
Tim Ogle

A lot of c# 3 features work in .net 2.0 as long as you don't target 3.5 system assemblies.  It's the same CLR so all of the anonymous methods, lambdas, partial classes, "var", etc can be used and still target 2.0.  (You'll miss the Action<> and Func<> generic delegates though, but it takes 10 seconds to write your own)

//this actually runs fine in .net 2.0 if you compile it with VS2008/2010 and target 2.0

private delegate void Foo();

private delegate string Test(string s);

static void Main(string[] args) {

var test = "hello";

Test toUpper = s => s.ToUpper();

Foo bar = delegate() {

Console.Out.WriteLine(toUpper(test));

};

bar();

}

You can easily make use of c#3.5 features in your source code and provide .net 2.0 compatible assemblies to your customers using this technique.

That being said, it probably is about time to move to 3.5, even though a few of our customers are still running Windows 2000 Server which can't run .net 3.5.   As long as we give them a 1 year warning to upgrade those servers we can live with it (that means we won't be able to use the 11.2 version on that product until this time next year).  Hopefully you'll fix bugs in the 11.1 or 10.x trunk for a year or so after this announcement?

Please don't move to .net 4.0 though (most of our customers have .net 3.5 already installed on their workstations, but not 4.0)  We don't like to make our customers perform system upgrades when we release upgrades to our software because the end-users that deploy our upgrades don't have administrative permissions on their boxes (we local deploy EXEs and DLLs into a subfolder in the user's home directory for upgrades).  

13 July, 2011
Normand Carbonneau
Normand Carbonneau

+ 1 Framework 4.0

13 July, 2011
Filipe Pavan
Filipe Pavan

+1 for moving to 4.0

13 July, 2011
Ho Kuen Leung
Ho Kuen Leung

+1 for moving to 4.0

Although one system still stay @ 2.0 since a Win2000 server is still in production (upgrade next year)

13 July, 2011
Dennis 3
Dennis 3

+1 for going straight to 4

14 July, 2011
Veerle Dieltjens
Veerle Dieltjens

Move to 3.5 is OK.

Moving to 4 NOT, because Microsoft itself doesn't support everything in VS 2010 yet. We target both desktop Windows and Win CE, and the latter refrains us to move to VS 2010. And keeping 2 versions of VS in use, with the Team Foundation integration is additional work we want to avoid.

14 July, 2011
Veerle Dieltjens
Veerle Dieltjens

Move to 3.5 is OK.

Moving to 4 NOT, because Microsoft itself doesn't support everything in VS 2010 yet. We target both desktop Windows and Win CE, and the latter refrains us to move to VS 2010. And keeping 2 versions of VS in use, with the Team Foundation integration is additional work we want to avoid.

14 July, 2011
Robert O'Brien
Robert O'Brien

+1 for moving to .NET 4

14 July, 2011
Jef Verheyden
Jef Verheyden

.NET 3.5 & VS2008 are a minimum requirement for us.

Because part of our applications use C++ dll's that are also used on mobile platforms that are not supported by microsoft in VS 2010. (Mixed Platforms for who don't understand it)

In the industrial world it isn't that simple to move forward, so we'll stick with 2009 & 2010 if required for now but then 2011 would be out of the question with the next upgrade of our systems because our companies can't jump on each new Microsoft hype/upgrade/bug/feature that comes out every month or so.

14 July, 2011
Garry Lowther
Garry Lowther

+1 for moving to .NET 4.0

14 July, 2011
İbrahim Demirel
İbrahim Demirel

Move on to .Net4.0 and VS 2010

14 July, 2011
Willem de Vries
Willem de Vries

+1 for .NET Framework 4.0

14 July, 2011
Encodo Systems AG
Encodo Systems AG

If you need more data, we've been using .NET Framework 4.0 / VS 2010 exclusively since August 2010, as are all of our customers (we have a .NET framework).

So, +1 for .NET 4/VS 2010

14 July, 2011
Alexander Stärk
Alexander Stärk

+1 for moving to .NET 4.0 and VS 2010

projects that cannot be upgraded could still stick to the current version of your controls and all other projects would benefit of the progress the platform has made.

Sure, you should support the 'final' .net 2/3/3.5 version for a while so that bugs are getting fixed.

But since WPF and Silverlight already require .Net 4 it would only be consistent requiring it for the whole library to benefit of the platform progress on the whole

14 July, 2011
Andrew Hanson
Andrew Hanson

We are on .net 4.

Move on please

14 July, 2011
Bassam Abdelaal
Bassam Abdelaal

+1 for .NET 3.5 like you intend to do , Not 4.0 , We still have projects with VS2008 & .NET 3.5

we left VS2005 long time ago

Thanks

14 July, 2011
Francois Massey
Francois Massey

-1 for .NET 4.

We have a dozen applications under VS2005 and .NET 2.0. The target audience of our applications is slow adopter of new technologies but strong on security (read paranoid almost). Moving to .NET 4 would be a huge hassle for our customers as they have little privileges to their computers. We risk alienating them. So no go for us.

14 July, 2011
Chris Gibson 4
Chris Gibson 4

+1 for .Net Framework 4.

14 July, 2011
Mark Chimes
Mark Chimes

+1 for .Net Framework 4.

14 July, 2011
Calin Macrinici
Calin Macrinici

I'm stuck with .Net 2 for now for reasons independent of me, but I'll take your upgrade path under advisement -- thanks for the head up, December still gives me 6 months or so to get my house of cards in order, so I can safely (and easily?) make the jump up.  If I do though, I'll probably jump straight up to 4, so I'm ambivalent about support for 3.5.  

16 July, 2011
Jim Foye
Jim Foye

+1 for .NET Framework 4.0. Customers who are still on 3.5 will not be abandoned, they will simply be in the same group as those who are still using 2.0.

23 July, 2011
Gregor Stamac
Gregor Stamac

+1 for moving to .NET 4.0

29 July, 2011
Murray
Murray

Please continue support for .Net 3.5 and VS 2008.

9 August, 2011
Dirk Bester
Dirk Bester

Older versions are already supported by ... older versions.

Just move to VS 2010 + .NET 4.0

18 August, 2011
Edin Mehmedovic
Edin Mehmedovic

Move straight to .Net 4. We need DevExpress nativly compiled in .Net 4. All this compatibility stuff hold us pure .net 4 people back. .Net 3.5 and bellow can use 11.1.

29 September, 2011
Haris Tafro
Haris Tafro

Move to .Net 4.0 and VS.2010

29 September, 2011
surlydev
surlydev

Hey spare a thought for us guys that are using VS 2005, YES FIVE at work.

That is ... on the days that I'm not coding in VB6, or Access VBA still.

*sigh*

27 October, 2011
surlydev
surlydev

I've spent the last three days at work using the VB6 Printer object to print  7.5 x 5cm labels, with a pretty border and logo in the corner.

27 October, 2011
Ferdi Botha
Ferdi Botha

I know this is a little late for reply, but everyone seems on the band wagon with .NET 4.0.

However there are still a lot of us using .NET 2.0. Now from what I read the amount of features being added to v2011.2 is not that trivial that it may require .NET 4.0.

This is a big jump for some users, and not all have the resources available to make this big jump.

Do you not think such a jump and move should be done on a yearly major release, e.g. leave the current v2011.2 on .NET 2.0+, however the upgrading v2012.1 to .NET 4.0+.

It's already the end of 2011, and I am not sure what difference it would make if we wait another 4 months for such a huge jump, because by the time .NET 5.0 would be released there are still a huge backlog of customers / clients not even on .NET 4.0.

Yes we need to move forward in this technology eara, however more than 70% of our customers don't even use .NET 4.0.

Just my 2 cents...

28 October, 2011
Ferdi Botha
Ferdi Botha

* It is also true that a lot of people use Visual Studio 2010 - me included, however I build my packages targeted at .NET 2.0, which may change the ratio mentioned above than 3% or even less use VS 2005.

Ths reason I prefer 2010 above 2005 is because of all the nice IDE enhancments made to .NET, especially the ability to be able to cimpile against various version of .NET (2.0, 3.5, 4.0, etc.)

Think of it this way, if MS has not intended to still use 2.0 2 years from now, they would not have given developers such an option. Even the 2010 IDE will allow you to target 4.5 platforms (if updated).

I just have a feeling that 2.0 will still be available in the long run, the exact same things happened last year / beginning of this year, where everybody kept on saying we should jump on the band wagon with Silverlight / WFP, with the statements that the desktop will die down, yet it seems the Desktop is an amazing thing as it had made a huge come back, and will live-on forever; well maybe not forever, but maybe in my lifetime at least, and I estimate I still have a good 70+ years ahead of me (if God spares me :)) and saying that - I love your products they are the best - think of it as such for my renewals over the next 70 years you will profit from renewals * 70 (just from me = $499 * 70 = you will get a good solid at least $35,000 from me) ... so please do support .NET 2.0 - atleast still this year (2011) - which may just give me enough time to invest and start planning an upgrade path ...

28 October, 2011
stefano del furia
stefano del furia

+1 for .Net Framework 4.

Go for 4.0 !!!!

18 November, 2011
Rick Bartlett
Rick Bartlett

+1 .Net 4.0

19 November, 2011
Özgür Dener
Özgür Dener

+1 for .NET 4!

23 November, 2011
Carlos Gamez
Carlos Gamez

+1 for .NET Framework 4.0

23 November, 2011
Piotr Borkowski
Piotr Borkowski

+1 for .NET Framework 4.0

21 February, 2013

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